Jarrah

Jarrah timbers reflect the hues of the Western Australian landscape. The heartwood varies in colour from rich reds to browns, while sapwood ranges from a pale yellow to orange. The texture of the timber is moderately coarse and even-textured grain, although some interlocked, wavy grain may feature, creating interesting fiddle-back figure. This makes it an appealing architectural and design material.

Jarrah's natural properties include a high resistance to weather, rot, termites and even marine borers, making it valuable for a range of outdoors uses. Its density also makes it fire resistant.

Reccommended uses: Jarrah has a history of use in engineering applications such as wharf and bridge construction, railway sleepers, cross-arms, piles, and for road bases. Its structural applications include posts and poles, framing, flooring, lining, decking and cladding.

A highly versatile timber, jarrah can also be used for woodturning, making it useful in the manufacture of high quality indoor furniture and weather resistant outdoor furniture that stands the test of time. The wood is also prized by luthiers for creating guitar and banjo necks.