Merbau

The attractive yellow-orange brown hue of freshly cut heartwood deepens or reddens with ageing. This contrasts markedly with the merbau sapwood, which is white, pale yellow or buff coloured. If left untreated, the sapwood is susceptible to lyctid borer attack. Beyond that, merbau is quite resistant to termites and seasons well with kiln or air-drying, exhibiting only a low degrade and very little shrinkage or movement. The grain of merbau can vary but it is usually interlocked or wavy, with a coarse but even texture, often prized for its attractiveness on backsawn material.

 

It will finish well with paint, stain, and polish although gum bleed is a possibility.

Reccommended uses: Merbau spans a variety of uses in the fields of engineering, construction, marine and furnishings, both for the indoors and outside. It has been utilised for infrastructure projects including cross arms, bridge building, piles, sleepers, posts, wharves and mining timbers. In the construction context merbau is used in framing, decking, treads and other general needs. Many boats, particularly the decks, are made of merbau, as are a variety of vats, musical instruments and tool handles. As a furniture material merbau is prominent in outdoor settings and barbeque trolleys, as well as being valued for turning, paneling, joinery, shop fitting, cabinet making, parquet flooring, carving, veneer, counter and bench tops.

Not recommended for: 

Our general availability

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